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A Soldier is contributing to the enslavement of women
Military Prostitution and the U.S. Military in Asia

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In the News

Metro Tokyo ordinance on sexually explicit manga walks fine line on freedom of speech
The Mainichi Daily News, 12/13/2010
SDP head criticizes Kan's possible dispatch of SDF to Korean Peninsula
The Japan Times, 12/13/2010
2 Japanese local assembly members visit one of Senkaku Islands
Associated Press, 12/13/2010
Why Japan is ready for anything Pyongyang might want to throw at it
Guardian, 03/01/2010
Japan disputes racism allegations at U.N. panel
Kyodo, 02/26/2010

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JAPAN NEWS
News and Photos of Japan - Dive Deeper into Japan with Japan Correspondent Kjeld Duits

Busy Japanese Kids

If you think that you are busy, watch this NHK program about the super busy schedules of Japanese kids. What are their parents thinking, I wonder?

NHK • Friday March 28, 2008 • Add Comment

Dark Fantasies

Miya Kishimura

Japanese photographer Miya Kishimura pulls you into a dark world of fantasy from which it is difficult to escape. A school girl in uniform with desperate eyes. The same girl with grotesque make-up. In another shot she lies on the street, seemingly dead. This is Kishimura’s world.

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• Friday March 21, 2008 • Add Comment

How to Sushi...

If you have ever been to a real Japanese sushi shop, you will love this video clip. It takes a little time before it really gets going, but I almost fell off my chair laughing. Enjoy!

Boyok • Wednesday January 23, 2008 • Add Comment

Japanese Farmer-Philosopher Masanobu Fukuoka: Natural Farming Greening the Deserts

Rice Paddy

(by Yuriko Yoneda) – A farming method called ‘natural farming’ needs no tilling, no fertilizers, no pesticides, and no weeding. For about 60 years, Masanobu Fukuoka, Japan’s renowned authority on natural farming, worked on methods based on his own unique theories, insights and philosophy. His seminal book, “One-Straw Revolution,” first published in 1975, was later translated into English, French, Spanish, Chinese, Russian and other languages, and has been read around the world. The book addresses not only the practical aspects of natural farming but also the root causes of environmental deterioration. Fukuoka’s thoughts and philosophies have inspired many people worldwide by pointing out a way of life. Here we introduce his thought and practices.

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Japan for Sustainability • Wednesday June 21, 2006 • Add Comment [1]

Japanese Dolphin Drive Hunts: Right or Wrong?

Dolphin in Taiji

On the coast of the small Japanese town of Taiji some ten fishing boats are bobbing quietly up and down on the quiet waves. Fishermen on the boats beat on long metal poles which are stuck into the water. At the end of each pipe is a metal disc which drives the noise into the water like a loudspeaker. About five dolphins flee away from the terrifying sound, in front of the bows of the boats. For hundreds of years this dolphin hunt has been taking place. Now it has to stop say nature activists.

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• Friday October 7, 2005 •

Selling Fruits to the World

Shoichi Aoki

Thanks to his book FRUITS (more than 100,000 copies sold worldwide), Shoichi Aoki’s street magazine Fruits is now better known abroad than in Japan itself. The magazine with an almost cult-like following in Japan has been documenting Tokyo street fashion since 1996. I had an exclusive interview with Aoki.

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• Wednesday August 25, 2004 • Add Comment

An Island of Ghosts

Gunkanjima

Off the coast of the Japanese city of Nagasaki lies a terrifying symbol of shortsighted development. Out of the dark blue East China Sea rises a dead island covered with dilapidated concrete buildings. Forms of life are absent. No people, no animals. However, in the not so distant past more than five thousand inhabitants lived here. The voices of children echoed from the houses, laughter sounded in the streets. Now only dead concrete is left. This is the island Hashima, once the most densely populated place in the world.

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• Tuesday August 24, 2004 • Add Comment